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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but will the sentence ever be carried out? >>> and dogs running wild in detroit. the new problem facing america's largest bankrupt city. >>> and honey booboo's big day. [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share
to death. >>> and dogs running wild in detroit. the new problem facing america's largest bankrupt city. >>> and honey booboo's big day. [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. >>> our second story outfront, the decision to go to war. president obama said tonight he has not yet determined whether or not to strike syria but he did lay out his justification for u.s. involvement. >> when you start talking about chemical weapons in a country that has the largest stock pile of chemical weapons in the world where over time their control over chemical weapons may erode, where they lied to terrorist organizations that have targeted the united states, then there is a
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
it in ohio, detroit, pennsylvania. >> they're doing it in texas. >> it would create jobs. so many opportunities for all americans. there is your answer. >> i want to add one point. i lived in atlanta. the day i arrived in atlanta, my first day on the air i got a call from maynar, d jackson. i got to know andrew young, josea williams. martin luther king's driver. i got to know these guys. what they did many the face of such hostility is an amazing profile in courage. what they did made this country better. >> absolutely. >> the president gave a good speech today, bob. one of the best speeches i have heard him give. >> talk about entitlements. unfortunately president obama has only expanded entitlements to make whites, blacks, hispanics more dependent. it's not helping anybody. you and i know more could be done in washington, d.c. it's cultural. when you have a president who is -- i know you don't like him. i don't like what he does. h's a good father, appearingly a good husband. there are no sex scandals. he's there for his kids. his pants are pulled up. he speaks gramattic -- corr
of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hungering for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't historically black colleges and universities desperate for stability be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these? as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the great depression, america needs a new marshall plan for our cities to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's exhortation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace
and extracted that phrase and first used it in the detroit speech and then the speech in washington. >> i think one of the things to remember about dr. king, he was always operating on multiple levels in the context of the speech. he had just visited the university of virginia, only about three months before the march on washington 15 years ago where he was given a very academic speech and really spoke from the professor voice and academic voice about philosophy. remember, the university of virginia is mr. jefferson's university. it is the president, the founder who wrote that bad check, who wrote of course that extraordinary founding document that said we take it as self evident that all people are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights and if if there was any self evidence on the mountain in 1776 than the fundamental human equality and so we see in king drawing on his ak sem i can self and a moment of african-american american woman dom preacher dom and the great historic document. >> we talk about the historic speeches and you can see tens of thousands get
to discussions in the black study center. paul kuntzler was born in detroit, michigan, in 1941 and raised at grosse pointe there before moving to washington, d.c. in 1951, he was active with the michigan young democrats and the congress on racial he called it. he credits john f. kinney as a major influence on his political consciousness. iin december 19 city with a move to washington, d.c. just days before his 20th birthday. he attended both the northern virginia center of the university of virginia and george mason university. for 32 years he was on the senior staff of the national science speakers association as assistant executive director for advertising exhibits an exhibitor workshops. in 1962, he was elected to the board of directors of the society of washington, the districts first gay-rights group. on april 17, 1965, he was one of 10 people in the world's first gay-rights picket in front of the white house. he is also one of the founders of the gay and lesbian activists alliance. he has an incredible memory are displayed by his tendency to recall events not just by the day but dow
, the stench of his blood was in the air. the big march in detroit, the week later. of course, the birmingham monday less than a month later. then kennedy. there was a season of tumultuous uprising in our country and a lot of bloodshed along the way and a lot of fear. >> and that issue of where the vines was coming from and who should fear the violence. i'll talk to you for a moment. i have something i would like us to listen to. on meet the press, roy wilkins being asked about the likelihood that it would be marchers who would riot. let's take a listen. >> mr. wilkins, there are a great many people, as i'm sure you know, that believe it would be impossible to bring more than 100,000 militant negroes into washington without incidence and possibly riot. >> i don't think there will be any rioting. i don't think a hundred thousand people, just assembling, is cause for apprehension about a riot. the city of washington has accommodated much larger crowds and nobody has talked up in advance the possibility of violence. >> so as you just pointed out, all of the violence up to this moment had been ag
to take place. >> juan, go ahead and respond to wayne there. weologist know, detroit, 41% poverty rate and st. louis 21%. the ten most dangerous cities in the country have the highest, most elevated poverty numbers in the country. >> yeah, poverty, unemployment, failure drops out from school and, guess what, a high percentage of minority. it hurts my heart. but, wayne, this is what you need. you need leadership that will come in and speak to kids who are not advancing and who are not making any progress and, instead, get involved with gang activity and with violence and this is how they can prove there is somebody in this world. that's a losing prescription. you have to believe in education. you have to believe in a job and building a resume. i don't think that this is a mystery if you want to make it in america. >> jonathan, there is -- >> even maybe a minimum wage job that would keep a young person out of trouble and focused on producing on the future. i mean, there's no question the gang has already pointed out. less likely to be this type of violent crime in a stronger economy. you
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)